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Tag Archives: young writers

Genre Editor, Peter LaBerge Interviews National Book Award Finalist, Beth Kephart

August 8, 2013, by

Beth Kephart

Beth Kephart

Beth Kephart is an American author of non-fiction, poetry, and young adult fiction for adults and teens.  She has written and published fifteen books, and has received several grants and awards for her writing.  She was a National Book Award Finalist for her book “A Slant of the Sun: One Child’s Courage,” and her book “Small Damages” just last month was named the Armchair BEA Young Adult Novel of the Year.  She lives in Philadelphia, where she is … Read more

Kerri Majors, author of “This is Not a Writing Manual”

July 22, 2013, by

Sunny Side Up

On the long road of the writing life, you’re going to encounter a lot of clichés—people are going to foist them upon you (“English major?  What’re you gonna do with that?”), you’re going to meet a lot of them at parties (Dude with the black turtleneck and vinyl record collection, you need a makeover), and you may even fall into a few yourself (when you see yourself typing “like a kid in a candy store,” step … Read more

Why We Do What We Do At Polyphony H.S.

April 7, 2011, by

A Letter to Grownups
from the co-founder and artistic director of Polyphony HS

Some time after April 15, 2010, the deadline for submissions for this issue, I met a friend
and poet, Laura Van Prooyen, for a cup of coffee. During her days as a graduate student
Laura spent a semester studying with the poet Heather McHugh. As I spoke with Laura
about my work with Polyphony HS, she told me that morning what Heather once said
about poetry. “Poetry … Read more

“A Fork in the Road”

September 1, 2010, by

One of the most important constants I have found in my time as a Polyphony HS editor has been that if the author does not know what they want to write, the final product will turn out poorly. This may seem obvious, but many a piece has come through the submission manager without meeting this criterion. Knowing what you want to write includes knowing what you want to convey to the reader, what your own strengths and weaknesses are, and … Read more

Observe and Tweet.

April 16, 2010, by

When the social networking site Twitter launched in March of 2006, teenagers received it with a resounding mixture of confusion and dismissal. “What’s the point?” and “I don’t understand it” became the most common response to Twitter-focused conversations in the cafeteria. But beyond the walls of high schools around the world, professionals—musicians, politicians, and actors—signed up to self-promote.

A longtime fan of standard blogging, I found Twitter and fell instantly in love. Many of my peers scoffed at my new … Read more

A student-run national literary magazine for high school writers and editors